IMPORTANT NOTICE
CALL 1-435-623-3254 BEFORE VISITING A CVMC HOSPITAL OR CLINICS
FOR HIGH FEVER, COUGH, OR DIFFICULTY BREATHING SYMPTOMS.

IF YOU’RE EXPERIENCING LIFE-THREATENING, SEVERE SYMPTOMS, DIAL 9-1-1 OR VISIT THE CLOSEST EMERGENCY ROOM.

COVID-19 Visitor Restrictions

COVID-19 Current Situation

Central Valley Medical Center is working hard to continue to support the community with all their healthcare needs during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. CVMC has a robust COVID-19 preparedness plan and is ready to respond to community needs in collaboration with our local and state health agencies.

What You Need to Know

  • CORONAVIRUS FAQS

    What we know

    Each day, new cases of COVID-19 are being recorded worldwide. With a lot of questions still unanswered, here are the facts we know.

  • I DON'T FEEL WELL

    What should I do?

    It is important to continue to see your provider for regularly scheduled visits to address your other health care needs. Do not neglect your existing needs.

  • MORE RESOURCES

    Social Distancing

    With so much going on, here are some resources to help you sort through all the information. Stay up to date on local, state, and national changes.

LATEST UPDATES

Update May 27, 2021: CVMC COVID Hotline Gets New Hours

Central Valley Medical Center is working hard to continue to support the community with all their healthcare needs during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

The safety of our patients, caregivers, and the community is our top priority at Central Valley Medical Center. Our facilities and staff are prepared to continue safe, routine care during this public health issue with COVID-19. It is important to continue to see your provider for regularly scheduled visits to address your other health care needs. Do not neglect your existing needs. If you need to make an appointment with your provider please call to make an appointment.

If you have general questions about COVID-19 or if you are sick with mild symptoms, and think you may have been exposed to a COVID-19 patient or recent travel to an area where COVID-19 is active and you think you may have been exposed, then; please self-isolate and follow prevention measures to help reduce the chance of spread. CVMC has updated our hotline hours. You can call Central Valley Medical Center's COVID HOTLINE, Monday - Friday 8 am - 5 pm, at 435-623-3254 to talk to a nurse. If you’re experiencing life-threatening, severe symptoms, dial 9-1-1 or visit the closest emergency room.

CVMC is currently coordinating with local and state public health departments and officials. We will continue to gather information and resources to keep our patients, staff, providers, and community updated.

Update May 13, 2021: Statewide Masks in Schools Requirement Removed for the Last Week of School

Governor Spencer Cox announced that public school mask requirements will be lifted for the last week of school. A decrease in cases in school districts and increasing numbers of vaccinated individuals prompted the change. Gov. Cox made the announcement during his weekly COVID-19 media briefing.

“Our number one goal all along has been the desire and the need to keep kids in school,” Cox said. “We have done that as well, if not better, than any other state.”

The change was made official in a new public health order changes the mask requirement to end on the “Monday of the last week of the 2020-21 school year or, in the case of non-traditional school, May 31, 2021.”

Gov. Cox said the move was done in consultation with several school district superintendents who expressed a desire for the requirement to be lifted, but masks are still encouraged.

“Give kids an opportunity to see their teachers, to see their friends, to spend that last week together without masks, if they so choose,” Cox said.

School districts still have the option to continue mask mandates in their schools if they feel there is still a substantial COVID-19 threat.

Information on COVID-19 cases in schools can be found on our case counts page (under the “Schools” tab).


Also at the briefing, Gov Cox stressed the need for Utahns to get vaccinated, noting that vaccinations across the country have slowed.

“This is how we get out of this pandemic forever,” Cox said. “This is the thing that prevents it from coming back in the fall.”

State officials will start exploring incentive options to encourage those who haven’t received the COVID-19 vaccine to do so. Businesses and organizations can also request a mobile vaccination clinic to help make the vaccine more accessible.

Update May 12, 2021: CDC clears way to vaccinate 12-15 year olds

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), acting on recommendations from its Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), today cleared the way for 12-15 year olds to begin receiving the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine.

The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) recommends vaccine providers throughout the state become familiar with the CDC’s recommendations for vaccinating this age group, and to begin offering vaccines as soon as they are able.

Approximately 215,000 Utah children fall into this age group and are now eligible to receive the vaccine.

“The sooner providers start vaccinating these kids the better,” said Gov. Spencer J. Cox. “Many Utah parents have been waiting for this news so they can make sure their families are more fully protected. This will mean safer gatherings with family and friends and an epic summer.”

Since the beginning of the pandemic, 23,419 Utah children ages 12-15 have been diagnosed with COVID-19. Approximately 201 12-15 year olds needed to be hospitalized. Of those requiring hospitalization in that age group, 14 developed multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). MIS-C is a serious condition that can lead to death.

“Despite popular thinking, many kids get COVID-19. Some of them get sick enough to require treatment in hospitals and some suffer from serious, potentially long-lasting side effects at rates similar to adults, even when they were asymptomatic or had only mild symptoms at the time of their infection,” said Dr. Michelle Hofmann, deputy director of the UDOH. “Protecting these kids by getting them vaccinated is such an important milestone in the COVID-19 response.”

The CDC also adjusted its recommendations on administering COVID-19 vaccines at the same time as other vaccines. The COVID-19 vaccine may now be given simultaneously with other vaccines.

“Over the past 15 months we have seen an increase in the number of Utah kids who are overdue for routine immunizations,” said Rich Lakin, immunization program manager at the UDOH. “With this change from the CDC we have an important opportunity to not only vaccinate adolescents against COVID-19, but to also catch these kids up on other routine vaccinations.”

The FDA authorized use of the vaccine in children ages 12-15 earlier this week after reviewing data from Pfizer-BioNTech’s clinical trials. The trials included 2,260 participants in this age group. Of these, 1,131 adolescent participants received the vaccine and 1,129 received a saline placebo.

The FDA reports no cases of COVID-19 occurred among vaccine recipients and 16 cases of COVID-19 occurred among placebo recipients. The vaccine was 100% effective in preventing COVID-19 in the clinical trial.

The most commonly reported side effects, which typically lasted 1-3 days, in the adolescent clinical trial participants were pain at the injection site, tiredness, headache, chills, muscle pain, fever and joint pain.

The FDA has updated the Fact Sheets for Healthcare Providers Administering the Vaccine (Vaccination Providers) and for Recipients and Caregivers with information to reflect the use of the vaccine in the adolescent population, including the benefits and risks of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine.

For more information on how to find a COVID-19 vaccine in Utah visit https://coronavirus.utah.gov/

Update May 10, 2021: Pfizer Vaccine for ages 12 and older

The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) is encouraged by today’s news that the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to include adolescents 12 through 15 years of age.

As is the case with all vaccines, the UDOH recommends providers wait for final guidance from the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) prior to administering COVID-19 vaccine to anyone ages 12-15 years.

ACIP is currently scheduled to meet this Wednesday, May 12, and is expected to issue its recommendation during the meeting. Individual providers will determine how quickly they can begin administering vaccine following ACIP’s guidance.

“There are approximately 215,000 Utah children in this age group and expanding vaccine access to them will push us even closer to the finish line in our battle against COVID-19,” said Dr. Michelle Hofmann, deputy director of the UDOH. “Data presented by Pfizer indicate its vaccine is highly effective at preventing COVID-19 in this age group. In fact, none of the clinical trial participants who received the vaccine ever became infected with COVID-19.”

Update May 6, 2021: New Gov. Cox Executive Order

In close consultation with local health departments, government authorities, vaccine providers and the Utah Department of Health, Gov. Spencer J. Cox has issued an Executive Order updating the state’s COVID-19 vaccination plan. It now removes the requirement that all prime doses of vaccines are administered within 7 days of receipt.

Early on in our vaccine distribution, we prioritized speed and large numbers to make as many doses available to high-volume vaccination sites. Now, with a more targeted approach to increase the convenience of vaccines for communities, businesses and organizations, we expect the rate of vaccinations to slow down and don’t want to penalize providers for taking longer to use doses.

The order still includes a requirement to establish procedures to offer the COVID-19 vaccine to eligible individuals in traditionally underserved communities.

View the full new executive order here

Update May 4, 2021: House Bill 294

The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) today notified the Utah State Legislature that all COVID-19 thresholds established in House Bill 294, Pandemic Emergency Power Amendments, have been met. The legislation, passed during the 2021 General Session, established criteria for eliminating COVID-19 public health orders based on case rates, ICU utilization, and prime doses of vaccine allocated to the state.

The thresholds required for terminating public health orders are:

  • A 14-day case rate less than 191 per 100,000 people (currently 163.4)
  • A 7-day average COVID-19 ICU utilization less than 15% (currently 11.2%)
  • More than 1,633,000 prime doses of COVID-19 vaccine allocated to the state (1,656,025)

In a letter notifying legislative leadership the criteria have been met, UDOH Executive Director Rich Saunders said, “I understand HB294 has been controversial. Important, legitimate arguments having been made on all sides of the issues. But today should give all of us reason to celebrate. No matter which side someone falls on, we can all be proud of the outcomes we have achieved so far.”

While HB294 ends most public health orders, it specifically allows UDOH to continue public health orders that pertain to public health and safety measures in K-12 schools.

In accordance with that section of the statute, the UDOH today issued State Public Health Order 2021-11. This order requires continued, routine testing of participants in high school sports and other extracurricular activities and also requires face coverings be worn in K-12 schools. This order expires on the last day of the 2020-21 school year or June 15, whichever occurs first.

“It’s important not to give up the ground we have gained, especially in our schools,” said Saunders. “We’re asking teachers, administrators, parents, and students to please hang in there, and finish the year on a healthy note.”

The COVID-19 Transmission Index, which identifies counties of high, moderate, and low disease transmission based on several established metrics will also continue. However, the index will only serve as an advisory tool of the steps individuals and businesses can continue to take to help limit the spread of COVID-19 in our communities.

Update April 23, 2021: Resuming Johnson & Johnson vaccine distribution

The Utah Department of Health (UDOH), following the direction of the FDA and CDC, is today lifting the statewide pause on the administration of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine.

This action follows a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). Effective immediately, COVID-19 vaccine providers in Utah may resume administering the Johnson & Johnson vaccine to anyone 18 years of age or older. The Committee voted 10-4 in favor of the action following lengthy discussions weighing the benefits of getting as many people vaccinated as possible against the risks of very rare reactions. Out of more than 8 million people who had been vaccinated with the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, 15 people, all females, experienced a rare blood clotting condition, and three died.

  • Johnson & Johnson and regulators plan to add language to the product label warning of the potential for a rare blood-clot condition.
  • For some women younger than age 50, there may be increased risks from the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. These women may choose to speak with their health care provider prior to receiving the vaccine, or choose another vaccine manufacturer. They may also choose to wait to be vaccinated until after next Tuesday when CDC releases further guidance.

CDC will release official guidance next Tuesday, but you can read their full statement here.

“For many Utahns, the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is the best vaccine,” said Governor Spencer Cox. “A single dose gives us the best chance of vaccinating people who are hard to reach by geography, those who are hard to reach because of personal schedules, those who might be less likely to return for a second shot, and even those who don’t like needles. We are relieved that these doses will rejoin our arsenal in the fight against COVID-19.”

Health care providers administering the vaccine and vaccine recipients or caregivers should review the Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine Fact Sheet for Healthcare Providers Administering Vaccine and Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers, which have been revised to include information about the risk of this syndrome, which has occurred in a very small number of people who have received the Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine.

Prior to the pause, more than 86,000 doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine had been administered in Utah. Approximately 53,000 additional unused doses remain on the shelves of vaccine providers throughout the state.

“Utah residents should be confident in the process that led to the pause, and also the process that led to the lifting of the pause,” said Dr. Michelle Hofmann, deputy director of the UDOH. “This situation is evidence that the system that ensures vaccine safety in our country works. A potential issue was identified, investigated, and addressed in a manner that allows for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine to again be safely administered in our state.”

Johnson & Johnson doses will resume shipping next week, and providers may now use any doses they have on-hand.

Update April 13, 2021: Temporary Pause of Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Administration

The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) is today recommending vaccine providers temporarily pause the administration of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine. The pause is to allow the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) time to investigate reports of a rare, treatable type of blood clots experienced by a small number of who received the vaccine.

More than 6.8 million doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine have been administered in the United States, and six people have reported experiencing blood clots. Nearly 77,000 Johnson & Johnson doses have been administered in Utah with no reports of blood clots among those patients.

“Even though these cases have occurred in just one out of every one million people who have received the vaccine, and even though it will slow our efforts to vaccinate Utah residents against COVID-19, calling for this pause is the right thing to do,” said Rich Saunders, UDOH executive director. “It’s critical the public be confident in the COVID-19 vaccines, and in order to build and maintain that confidence reports like these must be taken seriously and fully investigated to determine what role, if any, the vaccine played.”

The UDOH will coordinate closely with the FDA and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the coming days and will determine how to move forward based on those agencies ’ reviews of the situation.

The two other COVID-19 vaccines, manufactured by Pfizer and Moderna, represent the significant majority of doses administered in Utah and are unaffected by this announcement. More than 1.8 million doses of those vaccines have been administered in Utah.


If you are currently scheduled to receive a Johnson & Johnson vaccine, your health provider should be contacting you with more information. To find a vaccine provider, please visit our Vaccine Distribution page.

Update April 9, 2021 New Public Health Order

Today the Utah Department of Health released a new public health order updating COVID-19 health guidance. The current public health order will expire at midnight.

The new order will go into effect tomorrow, April 10, 2021 and will remain in effect until June 15, 2021 unless otherwise modified or amended.

View the full order here.

Update March 29, 2021: Get Both Doses of Your Coronavirus Vaccine

SALT LAKE CITY - As of Thursday, 714,049 Utahns have been vaccinated against COVID-19. But of those, only 394,004 are fully vaccinated.

That means 320,045 Utahns still have another shot to go, provided they received one of the vaccines developed by Pfizer-BioNTech or by Moderna; both require two doses for maximum effect. A third vaccine developed by Johnson & Johnson, which was recently approved for use, requires only one dose.

An AstraZeneca vaccine, likely the next approved for widespread use in America, requires two doses as well.

But how much does it really matter to get the second dose of the vaccine? After all, scientists agree that getting one dose of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccine will create some degree of immunity, introducing the body to a virus it was previously unfamiliar with and starting the process of antibody creation.

Two doctors KSL.com spoke to Thursday urged Utahns to finish their course of the vaccine, though, saying it’s crucial for the state to develop the herd immunity it seeks before lifting all coronavirus-related restrictions.


‘Nearly 100%’ effectiveness

Dr. Tamara Sheffield, medical director of community health and prevention for Intermountain Healthcare, said it’s not uncommon for vaccines of all kinds to require more than one dose.

“Most vaccines will have multiple doses, in a series, in order to stimulate the immune response,” Sheffield said. “The first year a child gets the influenza vaccine, they need two doses because they have not been exposed to the influenza vaccine in the past.” It’s only after that when patients get their yearly flu shot that they only need one dose at a time, Sheffield added.

The second dose of the coronavirus vaccine creates a greater, more effective immune response and also makes that response last longer. It’s humans’ “memory T” cells, Sheffield said, that create long-lasting virus prevention and may require more than one exposure to activate.

Estimates vary, but the Pfizer vaccine’s effectiveness after one dose is believed to be about 52%, based on its own data. After the second dose, that jumps to roughly 95% - a nearly unprecedented level of protection for modern vaccines, doctors say.

Dr. Emily Spivak, infectious disease physician at University of Utah Health, said the full vaccines are “nearly 100%” effective at preventing severe cases of the disease.

“People sort of get in the weeds of, well, this one is 70% effective ... versus 90%,” Spivak said. But they all prevent severe effects of the disease almost entirely, and that’s the important part, she said.

“I think regardless of the numbers, the real take-home is that you can get COVID-19 - and I have seen it numerous times - between your first and second dose,” Spivak said. She encouraged Utahns to stay vigilant even a week or two after they’ve received their second dose.

“I hesitate for people to obsess about the actual number - is it 70, or is it 50? - because the answer is, the two doses make it extremely effective. Like, never-seen-before effective, except maybe for measles.”

Officials recommend that the two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine are taken 21 days apart and that Moderna doses are taken 28 days apart. Sheffield and Spivak said it probably doesn’t hurt to wait a little bit longer than that, but recommend that Utahns avoid getting a second dose too soon.

Learn more HERE

Update March 25, 2021: FEMA will Provide Financial Assistance for COVID-19 Funerals

The COVID-19 pandemic has taken many lives and brought immense tragedy to families who have lost loved ones to this novel virus. FEMA announced an effort to try and soften the financial impact caused by the virus.

As part of the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021 and the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021, FEMA will provide financial assistance to families for COVID-19 funeral related expences that were incurred after January 20, 2020.

The program is set to open in April. Guidance is still being finalized and will be distributed by FEMA when it’s available. Some general information on who qualifies for this reimbursement and how to apply follows. In the meantime, those with qualified expenditures are advised to begin the process of gathering documentation to make the application process go smoother. Additional information can be found in FEMA’s FAQ document.


Who is Eligible?

To be eligible for funeral assistance, you must meet these conditions:

  • The death must have occurred in the United States, including the U.S. territories, and the District of Columbia.
  • The death certificate must indicate the death was attributed to COVID-19.
  • The applicant must be a U.S. citizen, non-citizen national, or qualified alien who incurred funeral expenses after January 20, 2020.
  • There is no requirement for the deceased person to have been a U.S. citizen, non-citizen national, or qualified alien.

How to Apply

In April, FEMA will begin accepting applications. If you had COVID-19 funeral expenses, we encourage you to keep and gather documentation. Types of information should include:

  • An official death certificate that attributes the death directly or indirectly to COVID-19 and shows that the death occurred in the United States, including the U.S. territories, and the District of Columbia.
  • Funeral expenses documents (receipts, funeral home contract, etc.) that includes the applicant’s name, the deceased person’s name, the amount of funeral expenses, and the dates the funeral expenses happened.
  • Proof of funds received from other sources specifically for use toward funeral costs. We are not able to duplicate benefits received from burial or funeral insurance, financial assistance received from voluntary agencies, government agencies, or other sources.

How are Funds Received

If you are eligible for funeral assistance you will receive a check by mail, or funds by direct deposit, depending on which option you choose when you apply for assistance.

Update March 18, 2021: Vaccine Eligibility for all Utahs Starting Next Week

Starting next Wednesday, March 24, any individual in Utah who is 16 years or older will be eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine.

Governor Spencer Cox announced made the announcement during the PBS Utah monthly governor’s news conference.

“We have next week about 15% of our doses that are available, have not been scheduled out yet,” Cox said. “So we do have doses available in many health districts.”

The state had originally anticipated opening up eligibility by April 1. Cox said the move was done out of a desire to keep demand ahead of supply to ensure that all doses are used, as well as move forward with the state’s plan of providing an equitable distribution to all Utahns.

“We’re also concerned about the equity piece; about hard-to-reach populations,” Cox said. “When we go into those places, we want to be able to vaccinate everyone. That’s the best way to do that.”

Cox asked Utahns to be patient and recognize that it may still take a few weeks to get an appointment as vaccine supplies are limited. Utahns are also encouraged to wait and be patient as providers adjust their systems and protocols to the new eligibility.

You can watch the entire news conference here.

Update March 4, 2021: Roadmap aims to make vaccines accessible to all Utahns

State officials have published a new health guidance document entitled Striving Towards Equity: Utah’s COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Roadmap. This roadmap is a dynamic, living document that aims to outline a fair and equitable distribution of COVID-19 vaccines. The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) hopes it will help providers, local officials and community groups ensure all Utahns have a fair opportunity for vaccination.

Learn More HERE

Update Feb 26, 2021: Johnson & Johnson vaccine should be available in Utah next week

Today, the FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC) unanimously recommended emergency use authorization of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine, also known as the Janssen vaccine. Once approved by the FDA and with guidance we expect to come from the CDC Sunday, Utah expects to begin receiving doses Wednesday.

“So many have suffered through this pandemic,” said Gov. Spencer J. Cox. “A third authorized vaccine tells me that even through some of our darkest times, miracles still happen. This is a testament to modern research, science, public health and medicine. We are in a race to save as many lives as possible through vaccines. This vaccine will do that. Remember, all three vaccines are safe and effective. You can have confidence that any of them will protect you and those around you from COVID-19.”

The Johnson and Johnson vaccine is authorized for people age 18 and up.

Once Utah receives doses, we will begin distributing them according to the eligibility standards we already have in place. We still await guidance from the CDC on how the vaccine will be recommended for use, but a single-dose vaccine, like this one, has great potential to protect people who may be less likely to be able to get a second dose. It is easier to store and gives us the ability to get the vaccine to more communities throughout Utah.

For more information on COVID-19 vaccines, please visit the Utah vaccine information page.

Update Feb 26, 2021: Update to Vaccine Eligibility

Individuals aged 16 and older with certain underlying medical conditions are now eligible to receive COVID-19 vaccine

Governor Spencer Cox announced yesterday all individuals aged 16 and older with certain underlying medical conditions are now eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine in Utah.

“We have so many more vaccines coming and they’re coming soon,” Cox said in this week’s COVID-19 media briefing. “We’re prioritizing theses individuals, again based on age and these underlying comorbidities because they are at the greatest risk of hospitalization or death.”

The list of approved underlying conditions that qualify an individual to receive the vaccine can be found on our vaccine distribution page.

Cox asked the public to be patient with pharmacies and local health departments as they adapt to the change and update their appointment systems to accommodate the new eligibility requirements.

Please note that only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved by the CDC for administration to individuals aged 16 and 17.

Opening up vaccine eligibility to this new group comes earlier than anticipated under the original vaccine distribution timeline. Cox said he’s been impressed with the speed at which providers have been able to administer vaccines and is committed to moving up the timeline whenever possible.

“In just one week we have given a first dose of vaccine to 29% of Utahns between the age of 65 and 69,” Cox said.

Also at Thursday’s briefing, Cox announced that effective immediately Utahns will be able to schedule an appointment with any health department, rather than just with the health department where they live. This change is being made to make COVID-19 vaccines more accessible to those who want them.

When making an appointment, keep in mind that Pfizer and Moderna vaccines require two doses approximately three to four weeks apart. You will need to receive your second dose at the same location as your first. Please plan accordingly. You can find a list of health department contact information, as well as links to local pharmacies that are administering vaccines on our vaccine distribution page.

Update Feb 24, 2021: Updates to COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Plan

In close evaluation with local health departments, government authorities and the Utah Department of Health, Gov. Spencer J. Cox has issued an Executive Order updating the state’s COVID-19 vaccination plan. It now includes a section regarding vaccine eligibility criteria. Vaccine eligibility will be based on the direction that the Utah Department of Health determines in consultation with the Governor’s Office.

View the full new executive order here.

More information on the state’s vaccine distribution plan can be found on our Vaccine Distribution page.

Update Feb 23, 2021: UDOH updates COVID-19 public health order

The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) has renewed a statewide public health order aimed at limiting the spread of COVID-19 in Utah communities. The order replaces a previous order that expired at midnight last night, and is effective through March 25, 2021.

Some key elements of the order include:

Masks: Are still required to be worn by individuals statewide in all counties across all transmission levels (high, moderate, low) when they are indoors in public settings, or outdoors when physical distancing is not feasible. Eight weeks after the UDOH announces the state has been allocated 1,633,000 first doses of vaccine masks will not be required in counties designated as having a “low” transmission level. To date, 444,905 prime doses have been allocated to Utah.


High School Extracurricular Testing: Often referred to as “Test to Play”, testing will now be required of all high school students participating in a one-time school-sponsored extracurricular activity such as a social dance. Students must follow the isolation and quarantine protocols found in the school manual.


K-12 Testing: Often referred to as “Test to Stay”, school districts are instructed to work with their local health departments (LHD) to determine the best course of action when a school reaches the outbreak thresholds established in the school manual. Districts may implement Test to Stay, or take other action to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. If the school implements Test to Stay, any student who tests positive must transition to remote learning for 10 days from the date of their test. Students who choose not to be tested should also transition to remote learning for 10 days if less than 60% of the school population participated in the testing event OR if the percent positivity from the testing event is 2.5% or higher. The intent is to ensure schools do not transition entirely to remote learning when they reach the outbreak threshold level.


Bars: In counties with “moderate” transmission levels, bars are no longer required to limit occupancy to 75%. A bar in a “moderate” county is required to ensure patrons wear masks when they are within six feet of patrons from a separate party.


Transmission Level Thresholds: The 7-day average percent positivity metric used to determine levels of transmission will now use the “test over test” percent positivity metric. Because the “test over test” percent positivity skews lower than the previous “people over people” the range for percent positivity in the Transmission Index will shift lower. A 7-day average percent positivity of greater than 10% will belong to the “high” transmission category; a percent positivity between 5.1%-9.9% will belong to the “moderate” transmission category; and a percent positivity of 5% or less will belong to the “low” transmission category.


Public Gatherings in Moderate: Public gatherings, such as live events, movie theatres, sporting events, weddings, recreation, and entertainment (does not apply to an individual attending or participating in a religious service), may occur with side-by-side seating if all patrons are wearing masks and can attest to being free of COVID-19 symptoms, and are not subject to quarantine or isolation. In the event someone in attendance tests positive for COVID-19, the event hosts must be able to contact any attendee who was a close contact of the positive cases. Masks may be removed to eat or drink, but six feet physical distancing must be maintained from anyone from a separate party during that time.


For more information on the COVID-19 Transmission Index and the public health order, including what businesses and individuals can do to help limit the spread of disease, visit coronavirus.utah.gov/utah-health-guidance-levels.

Update Feb 22, 2021: lowers flags in honor of the 500,000 American lives lost to COVID-19

In coordination with a proclamation from President Biden, Gov. Spencer Cox has ordered the lowering of the flag of the United States of America and the flag of the state of Utah in memory of the 500,000 American lives lost to COVID-19 and to highlight the magnitude of loss for so many families across the country.

“This week we join all Americans in mourning those we’ve lost to COVID-19, including the 1,853 Utahns who have died,” Gov Cox said. “May God bless their loved ones and all of us with comfort and healing at this difficult time.”

Flags will be flown at half-staff at all state facilities from sundown tonight through Friday, Feb. 26. All Utahns and private businesses are encouraged to participate as well.

Update Feb 18, 2021: 65+ Now Eligible for Vaccine

Governor Spencer Cox announced this morning that people age 65 and older are now eligible for the COVID-19 vaccines. This change will be effective immediately. Individuals aged 65-69 may now contact local health departments and local pharmacies to schedule their vaccine appointments.


This change only applies to those individuals aged 65 and older right now.

Consistent with previous vaccine distribution guidance, individuals with certain underlying medical conditions will be eligible starting on March 1st.

To see which underlying medical conditions will be included in this next phase of vaccine distribution, please visit https://coronavirus.utah.gov/vaccine-distribution/#eligibility.


As a reminder, the following groups of people are currently eligible to get the COVID-19 vaccine:

  • Healthcare workers who have contact with patients (like dentists, physical or occupational therapists, front office staff in a clinic, medical aesthetics, home healthcare workers, etc.)
  • Long-term care facility staff and residents
  • First responders like EMS personnel, law enforcement officers, dispatchers, and corrections officers
  • K-12 school teacher or staff
  • Utahns 65 years and older

Appointments are available at local health departments and select local pharmacies across the state. Please note that due to the demand and variable supply of vaccine doses, it may take several tries to get an appointment. We anticipate more vaccine providers will be added in the coming weeks/months as supply increases.

For more information on Utah’s vaccine distribution plan, please visit our vaccine distribution page.

Update Feb 16, 2021: Google/Apple Exposure Notification Express Launches in Utah

The state of Utah will launch the Google/Apple Exposure Notification Express system to help slow the spread of COVID-19. Starting tomorrow, Wednesday, February 17, 2021, Utahns can opt in to receive and share notifications about possible COVID-19 exposures. Smartphone users will receive three alerts over the next week encouraging them to turn on the notification system.

“Contact tracing is an important part of how public health responds and stops disease outbreaks. People who have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19 are more at risk of getting infected and making others sick,” said Navina Forsythe, director of the Utah Department of Health Center for Health Data and Informatics. “Exposure Notifications is a form of electronic contact tracing that uses encrypted or anonymous tokens exchanged through your phone and the phones of those around you to keep an encrypted log of who you’ve been in contact with. The service doesn’t track the location of the smartphone user and instead relies on anonymized interactions through Bluetooth technology.”

When two people have activated Exposure Notifications on their smartphones and come in close proximity to one another, they exchange anonymized “tokens” that log that close interaction for 14 days. A verification code is sent to individuals who test positive for COVID-19 by the Utah Department of Health. That code can then be entered into the Exposure Notification system by the individual who tests positive to alert others who came into close contact with them that they were possibly exposed to COVID-19. Anyone who was possibly exposed will be asked to watch for symptoms of COVID-19 and get tested. Users of Exposure Notification never know the identities of the person who tested positive or who was notified about a possible exposure.

“The success of Exposure Notification is dependent on how many people opt in to the service,” said Forsythe. “Modeling has produced estimates that if just 15% of a population uses Exposure Notifications, that in combination with manual contact tracing, there can be up to a 15% reduction in COVID-19 infections and 11% fewer deaths. A higher percentage of participation can lead to even greater reductions in disease.”

To learn more about Exposure Notifications Express, visit https://coronavirus.utah.gov/exposure-notifications/.

Update Feb 12, 2021: Changes to COVID-19 Transmission Index

The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) today announced two changes to the COVID-19 Transmission Index. The Transmission Index is the official health guidance for individuals and businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The first changes is to the percent positivity threshold levels. Last week UDOH announced a change in the way they will calculate percent positivity to more closely align with the way most other states are calculating the percent of positive COVID-19 cases. Previously Utah had been using a “people over people” method. Beginning next Thursday, February 18, the 7-day average percent positivity metric used to determine levels of transmission will transition to the “test over test” percent positivity metric.

Because the “test over test” percent positivity skews lower than the previous “people over people” method, the range for percent positivity in the Transmission Index will shift lower. A 7-day average percent positivity of greater than 10% will belong to the “high” transmission category; a percent positivity between 5.1%-9.9% will belong to the “moderate” transmission category; and a percent positivity of 5% or less will belong to the “low” transmission category.

Additionally, changes will be made to the actions individuals and businesses should take in areas of “moderate” and “low” transmission. A transmission level (high, moderate, low) is determined if a county has two of the three metrics in the designated level of transmission.

Public gathering requirements in areas of “moderate” transmission will be changed.

  • In these areas, public gatherings, such as live events, movie theaters, sporting events, weddings, recreation, and entertainment (does not apply to an individual attending or participating in a religious service), may occur with side-by-side seating as long as the event host completes the event template and all patrons are wearing masks, are assigned seating, and attest to not having any COVID-19 symptoms or exposures in the past 14 days.
  • Concessions stands must be closed in “moderate” due to increased risk that occurs with more people in attendance and when masks are removed to eat or drink.
  • Physical distancing between household groups is still strongly recommended at these venues.

In areas of “low” transmission, masks will be required and event templates must be completed by hosts, but no other restrictions are placed on these events.

For more information on the COVID-19 Transmission Index, including what businesses and individuals can do to help limit the spread of disease, visit coronavirus.utah.gov/utah-health-guidance-levels.

Update Feb 4, 2021: Vaccine Distribution Update

How Utah gets vaccines

The state orders vaccine doses through the CDC each week against an allotment that is determined by our state’s percentage of the adult U.S. population.

The federal government has a separate contract with CVS and Walgreen’s to administer vaccines in long-term care facilities.

Where vaccines are going

Our highest priority has always been to save lives, so vaccines are going to those at highest risk first. That includes hospital and healthcare workers, first responders, teachers, people in long-term care facilities and people over the age of 70.

Local health departments are using their doses much faster than some of our other partners. Local health departments have had practice with mass vaccinations and are consistently administering all of their doses within 7 days of receiving them.

LEARN MORE HERE

Update Jan 26, 2021: Statement on transfer of COVID-19 vaccine

At the direction of Governor Spencer J. Cox, the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) has been working closely with partners at CVS and Walgreens to transfer doses of COVID-19 vaccine from the long-term care federal pharmacy partnership to other vaccine providers in the state.

Walgreens and CVS have agreed to transfer 28,275 doses to the UDOH for distribution throughout the state. An initial shipment of 8,775 of these doses arrived in Utah this week. The remaining 19,500 doses will be available to be ordered this week and will be shipped next week.

CVS and Walgreens have adequate vaccine on-hand to continue with all scheduled vaccination clinics at long-term care facilities in Utah. Residents and staff of these facilities will continue to receive their vaccinations as planned, without interruption. We appreciate their efforts to vaccinate high-risk Utahns and those who care for them.

See our previous post for the history on this topic.

The 28,275 doses being transferred to the state will be administered to those populations already eligible for vaccination.

The transfer of these doses was approved by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

To get the latest updates on vaccines and who is eligible to receive them, please sign up for our email series “The Vaccine: Real Talk.”

Update Jan 25, 2021: State’s Free COVID-19 Testing Continues

The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) continues to offer free rapid antigen testing at many locations throughout the state of Utah. New sites are targeted each week based on high positivity rates, fewer tests conducted, untreated wastewater sampling, and other surveillance data. Some locations will be drive-through while others will be conducted in buildings. Everyone is encouraged to wear masks and social distance while waiting in lines.

Anyone older than age 5 can get tested at these free testing clinics, even if they do not have symptoms of COVID-19. Anyone who has any symptoms, even mild ones, should come and get tested. Please register online. If you do not register online or can’t register online, you will be able to register at the site but it will take longer for you to be tested. Identification may be required.

These testing clinics are designed to more quickly identify people who are currently infectious with COVID-19, including those who may not even know they are infected because they don’t have symptoms. Identifying these individuals will help slow the spread of infection in the community.

Rapid antigen tests are less sensitive than PCR tests. This means PCR tests are better than antigen tests at detecting the virus, particularly when a person has small amounts of virus in their body. If an individual has symptoms and tests negative on the rapid antigen test or an individual doesn’t have symptoms and tests positive on the rapid antigen test, they will be referred for a follow up, confirmation PCR test.

Locations selected for testing this week HERE.

Update Jan 24, 2021: Vaccine Distribution Update

Utah Vaccine Update HERE

Update Jan 21, 2021: Utah National Guard broadens COVID-19 support

DRAPER, Utah - The Utah National Guard, in cooperation with the Utah Department of Health, has expanded its support of the COVID-19 mission providing vaccinations and monoclonal antibody infusions to patients living in long-term care facilities throughout Utah.

On January 19, 2021, Utah National Guard Soldiers and Airmen began administering vaccinations in Utah County to civilians that are 70-years old or older. Getting vaccinated is an important step to help Utah and the country eliminate COVID-19 and get back to a normal life.

“We are excited to be on the frontlines of helping the governor in the delivery of vaccines,” said Tech. Sgt. Eric Bornemeier, medical team noncommissioned officer in charge. “We are here to serve the community, our families and neighbors; it’s our job as Guards members to be of help and to serve.”

The Monoclonal Infusion Strike Team will administer these therapies to long-term care facility patients that have recently been diagnosed with mild to moderate COVID-19 helping to reduce viral load, symptoms, and the risk of hospitalization.

“Once a positive COVID-19 test is confirmed, there is a seven-day window to receive the infusion,” said Bornemeier. “Antibodies are provided to the patient through the infusion, giving better outcomes and faster recovery times. It takes three hours for each patient to receive the infusion. It doesn’t take the place of the vaccine and doesn’t fight against all the different variances of the vaccine.”

Soldiers and Airmen from the Utah National Guard continue to provide the state with support to long-term care facilities; contact tracing and investigation teams; working to receive, stage, and ship personal protective equipment packages; mobile testing teams; lab call back; and additional support to the Utah Department of Health.

The safety of all citizens and service members remains a top priority. COVID-19 safety protocols are implemented during all support operations to ensure the safety of all Utahns. The Utah National Guard continues to be fully involved at the local, state and federal levels in the planning and execution of the nation’s response to COVID-19.

More information on monoclonal antibody therapy can be found here.

Update Jan 21, 2021: Vaccine Distribution Update

Vaccine Distribution Update HERE

Update Jan 19, 2021: More Testing Sites Across Utah Added

The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) is offering free rapid antigen testing at many locations throughout the state of Utah. Sites are chosen based on high positivity rates, fewer tests conducted, untreated wastewater sampling, and other surveillance data. Some locations will be drive-through while others will be conducted in buildings. We encourage everyone to continue to wear masks and social distance while waiting in lines.

Anyone older than age 5 can get tested at these free testing clinics, even if they do not have symptoms of COVID-19. We also encourage anyone who might have any symptoms, even mild ones, to come and get tested. Please register online. If you do not register online or are unable to register online, you will be able to register at the site but it will take longer for you to be tested. Identification may be required.

These testing clinics are designed to more quickly identify people who are currently infectious with COVID-19, including those who may not even know they are infected because they don’t have symptoms. Identifying these individuals will help slow the spread of infection in the community.

Rapid antigen tests are less sensitive than PCR tests. This means PCR tests are better than antigen tests at detecting the virus, particularly when a person has small amounts of virus in their body. If an individual has symptoms and tests negative on the rapid antigen test or an individual doesn’t have symptoms and tests positive on the rapid antigen test, they will be referred for a follow up, confirmation PCR test.

Locations selected for testing this week can be found HERE:

Update Jan 19, 2021: Bells ring at the Utah State Capitol

The Utah State Capitol bells rang 15 times on Tuesday, in honor of the 1,500 Utahns who have died of COVID-19 since March 2020.

Gov. Spencer J. Cox ordered that the bell ringing as part of a nationwide day of remembrance for the victims of the pandemic.

The state of Utah also joined cities and towns across the country in lighting buildings in amber, lighting candles or ringing bells at 3:30 p.m. MT. The remembrance events sparked after a national COVID-19 memorial was initiated by the Presidential Inaugural Committee.

“We will never forget the heavy toll this deadly virus has taken in this state, and we pray for comfort and peace to the families and friends left behind,” Gov. Cox said. “We hope all Utahns will join in honoring those we have lost during this national moment of remembrance.”

The ringing was streamed live to the State of Utah COVID-19 Response Facebook page and can also be heard below.

Update Jan 15, 2021: COVID-19 ‘UK variant’ discovered in Utah

The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) has confirmed the state’s first case of the B.1.1.7 COVID-19 variant, frequently referred to as the ‘UK variant’. The case was discovered through ongoing genetic sequencing of positive COVID-19 samples by the Utah Public Health Laboratory (UPHL).

The case is a 25-44 year old male from Salt Lake County who tested positive last month. The case has no known travel outside of Utah and experienced only mild symptoms. The Salt Lake County Health Department conducted routine case investigation and contact tracing activities with the case.

“We fully anticipated we would find this strain in Utah,” said Dr. Angela Dunn, state epidemiologist at the UDOH. “We know this strain is more transmissible than previous COVID-19 variants, and our hospitals continue to operate near or over capacity. So now more than ever, Utah residents need to wear masks, practice physical distancing, and avoid large gatherings.”

The COVID-19 vaccines currently approved for use are believed to be effective against this strain.

The UPHL has been performing genomic sequencing of the SARS-CoV-2 virus since the beginning of the pandemic, with the goal of sequencing 10% of the positive COVID-19 samples identified. The lab sequences positive samples it identifies, as well as samples routinely submitted from other laboratories throughout the state.

For more information on how to protect yourself from COVID-19 spread, visit our Protect Yourself page.

Update Jan 14, 2021: Public Vaccine Distribution

Public Reminder:
Please be aware that, CVMC WILL NOT BE DISTRIBUTING THE COVID-19 VACCINE TO THE PUBLIC.

Please, Contact your LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENT to schedule an appointment or to find out when vaccination clinics will be held. You must schedule your appointment ahead of time. Do not just show up without an appointment, as each local health department may have a different process for registration. Please understand they have limited vaccines and that appointments will fill up quickly. It may take a few tries to get an appointment.

State COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Information:
coronavirus.utah.gov/vaccine-distribution/#lhd

Update Jan 12, 2021: The People Behind the COVID-19 Hotline

The COVID-19 hotline, one might say, is the sometimes invisible cog that keeps the massive COVID-19 response effort moving. The hotline has taken more than 205,000 calls since the beginning of the pandemic in March - an average of 655 calls a day - and that massive number won’t stop growing any time soon.

The heroes who direct public inquiries and concerns about the pandemic are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Their knowledge in the field of healthcare is not the only attribute contributing to their success - they find real joy dedicating themselves to keeping the public informed with the most accurate, current information available.

What most people don’t know is that the COVID-19 hotline is staffed and run by the Utah Poison Control Center. While the Utah Poison Control Center has assisted in other public health emergencies, nothing compares to the massive scale of the pandemic response. What was supposed to be a few months of helping the state of Utah manage the initial demand for information, has turned into nearly a year of helping Utahns, and people across the country, find the answers they need.

Learn more HERE

Update Jan 11, 2021: Mild Side Effects from the COVID-19 Vaccine are Normal

It’s understandable that you might have questions or concerns about the COVID-19 vaccine. Many people are worried about how quickly the vaccines were developed and if they have any side effects. During the development of the COVID-19 vaccines, safety was the top priority. No steps were skipped, and the vaccines were rigorously tested. Clinical trials for COVID-19 vaccines didn’t find any specific safety concerns for any one group of people. This means the vaccine is safe for people of all of the ages that were studied, and for any race, ethnicity, those who have underlying medical conditions, and people who have already been infected with the virus that causes COVID-19. And while side effects are possible, the most important thing to remember is that the benefits of getting vaccinated outweigh the risks of getting COVID-19.

Learn more HERE

Update Jan 11, 2021: Free COVID-19 Testing Adds More Sites Across Utah

The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) is offering free rapid antigen testing at many locations throughout the state of Utah. Sites are chosen based on high positivity rates, lower numbers of tests conducted, untreated wastewater sampling, and other surveillance data. Some locations will be drive-through while others will be conducted in buildings. We encourage everyone to continue to wear masks and social distance while waiting in lines.

Anyone can get tested at these free testing clinics, even if they do not have symptoms of COVID-19. We also encourage anyone who might have any symptoms, even mild ones, to come and get tested. Please register online here. If do not register online or are unable to register online, you will be able to register at the site but it will take longer for you to be tested. Identification may be required.

The goal of these testing clinics is to more quickly identify people who are currently infectious with COVID-19, including those who may not even know they are infected because they don’t have symptoms. Identifying these individuals will help slow the spread of infection in the community.

Rapid antigen tests are less sensitive than PCR tests. This means PCR tests are better than antigen tests at detecting the virus, particularly when a person has small amounts of virus in their body. If an individual has symptoms and tests negative on the rapid antigen test or an individual doesn’t have symptoms and tests positive on the rapid antigen test, they will be referred for a follow up, confirmation PCR test.

Update Jan 8, 2021: Utah teachers, school staff, older adults to receive COVID-19 vaccine

Teachers and staff members in Utah’s K-12 schools will be eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine beginning the week of January 11. Utah Gov. Spencer J. Cox made the announcement in Friday’s COVID-19 briefing. Utah adults 70 and older will be eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine beginning the week of January 18.

Gov. Cox set a goal of fully immunizing all health care providers, long-term care facility staff and residents, first responders, public and tribal health frontline workers, K-12 teachers and school staff, and adults older than 70 by the end of February. Approximately 412,000 Utah residents from these population groups are expected to be vaccinated.

School districts have been working with their local health departments and other providers in their areas on plans for vaccinating their staff. Districts and administrators will communicate directly with their employees on how, when, and where to be vaccinated.

“We know there is tremendous demand among teachers for the vaccine, and we are thrilled to be able to accelerate the timeline for immunizing teachers,” said Gov. Cox. “There’s no part of our society that COVID-19 has impacted more significantly than education. Getting the vaccine out to teachers and school staff will provide stability in our schools and improve the educational experience of our students.”

Utah’s 13 local health departments have already vaccinated tens of thousands of Utah health care workers and first responders, and will also be responsible for vaccinating older adults. Older adults or their caretakers should contact their local health department late next week to learn about how to make an appointment.

“Providing vaccines for these additional groups is exciting, but it is important to manage expectations,” said Rich Saunders, Utah Department of Health executive director. “We are still receiving a limited number of doses each week, and demand is likely to outpace supply initially. Not everyone will be able to schedule an appointment next week, but we ask them to be patient and keep trying. We will have enough doses to eventually vaccinate everyone in these groups.”

Originally, teachers and school staff were anticipated to receive vaccinations later in January, and older adults in mid-February. Based on current vaccine administration progress, anticipated supply over the next several weeks, the important role schools play in society, and the severity of disease older adults experience, Utah’s Unified Command group recommended accelerating the vaccination timeline.

Subsequent populations being considered for vaccination priority include prioritization by additional age groups, residents with certain underlying medical conditions, and certain residents who live in congregate settings.

More details about the COVID-19 vaccine, and Utah’s distribution plan, can be found at coronavirus.utah.gov/vaccine.

Executive order

The governor’s executive order, describes vaccine eligibility and vaccine provider requirements, including not administering the vaccine to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 within 90 days, administering each COVID-19 vaccine within seven days of receiving the vaccine; and reporting data each day by 6:59 a.m.

It also states that a vaccine provider that does not comply with the Order may be subject to a reduced COVID-19 vaccine distribution or no distribution for future distribution periods. A COVID-19 vaccine not used within seven days of distribution is subject to redistribution.

The Order states the Utah Department of Health shall coordinate with local health departments to establish procedures to offer monoclonal antibodies to residents of long-term care facilities who have tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on the state’s vaccine distribution plan, please visit our vaccine distribution webpage.

Update Jan 4, 2021: Free COVID-19 Testing Expanded Across Utah

The Utah Department of Health (UDOH) is offering free rapid antigen testing at many locations throughout the state of Utah. Locations are chosen based on high positivity rates, lower numbers of tests conducted, untreated wastewater sampling, and other surveillance data.

Anyone can get tested at these free testing clinics, even if they do not have symptoms of COVID-19. Anyone who wants to be tested can find a location and register online through this online map. We also encourage anyone who might have any symptoms, even mild ones, to come and get tested. Please pre-register to cut down on delays at the test site. If you are unable to register online, you will be able to register at the site. Identification may be required.

The goal of these testing clinics is to more quickly identify people who are currently infectious with COVID-19, including those who may not even know they are infected because they don’t have symptoms. Identifying these individuals will help slow the spread of infection in the community.

Rapid antigen tests are less sensitive than PCR tests. This means PCR tests are better than antigen tests at detecting the virus, particularly when a person has small amounts of virus in their body. If an individual has symptoms and tests negative on the rapid antigen test or an individual doesn’t have symptoms and tests positive on the rapid antigen test, they will be referred for a follow up, confirmation PCR test. (Read more about the different types of tests here.)

Update Dec 31, 2020: How the mRNA Vaccine Works

A messenger RNA vaccine also called an mRNA vaccine, is a new kind of vaccine that is the first safe and effective vaccine being used to fight the COVID-19 virus in the United States.

Learn more HERE

Update Dec 18, 2020: The Distribution Timeline for the COVID-19 Vaccine

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued an Emergency Use Authorization for the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. While the first doses of the vaccine have arrived, we only have a limited supply. We want it to be easy for everyone to get a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as enough doses are available. Policymakers have developed plans to make sure those who are most at-risk get the vaccine first, and that vaccines are distributed in a fair, ethical, and transparent way.

The Utah Department of Health organized a workgroup made up of health professionals throughout the state (called the Utah Prioritization Workgroup) to develop recommendations for how to prioritize vaccination groups on the state and local level. Their final recommendations, called Utah’s COVID-19 Vaccination Plan, are based on current information about COVID-19 vaccines, state and local data, vaccine storage capability of facilities, and guidance from the CDC and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). The Strategic Vaccination Coalition is also providing feedback to the Utah Department of Health on how to prioritize limited supplies of the vaccine.

More vaccines will be available over the next few weeks and months. We expect these guidelines to change based on new information and data. We will continue to provide additional updates about vaccine distribution information when more doses of the vaccine become available. You can find these updates at https://coronavirus.utah.gov/vaccine.

As of now learn about the anticipated distribution timeline for the COVID-19 Vaccine HERE

Update Nov 8, 2020: state of emergency for hospital overcrowding, case surge

Governor and Utah Department of Health Issue Statewide Mask Mandate, Pause Extracurricular Activities, Ask Utahns to Limit Gatherings to Household Only

Following weeks of continued stress on Utah’s hospital networks due to a rise in cases of COVID-19, Gov. Gary R. Herbert has declared a new State of Emergency to address hospital overcrowding.

The situation is dire and unsustainable. We must take action now to protect our hospitals and healthcare workers and to avoid further devastation on our families, communities, and businesses.

Along with the State of Emergency, the governor and Utah Department of Health have issued concurrent executive and public health orders to curb the surge of cases in Utah.

Learn More HERE

Update Oct 30, 2020: Emergency Alert statewide due to rising case counts

Utah reported record case counts for COVID-19 today.

Despite the ongoing pandemic, there are a number of people who are not aware of the dire situation we find ourselves in.

Today, we will issue a single Wireless Emergency Alert statewide as a brief interruption to make sure nearly everyone is aware of the serious nature of the pandemic.

Learn More HERE.

Update Sept 19, 2020: Governor Herbert Renews State of Emergency

Governor also issues brief renewals of several suspended statutes

SALT LAKE CITY (Sept. 19, 2020) - With COVID-19 cases hitting record highs yesterday Gov. Gary R. Herbert has issued an Executive Order that will again place Utah under a State of Emergency. The previous order was scheduled to expire today.

Under the new State of Emergency, the governor will only take certain executive actions, such as suspending statutes, if asked to do so by the Public Health and Economic Emergency Commission. For more information on this policy, see the governor’s letter to legislative leadership here.

To that end, Gov. Herbert has issued brief renewals of statute and rule suspensions to allow Utah residents and agencies to prepare for the reactivation of the statutes and rules. These suspensions allow Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control licensees to maintain their licenses even if they close down for a period of time; suspend some requirements for using telehealth; suspend requirements that parole hearings be open to in-person participation; and allow flexibility to retired employees who have not been separated from employment from a public employer for one year to return to work on COVID-19 related issues without jeopardizing their retirement benefits.

Going forward, phased health guideline changes and mask mandates will be issued as public health orders under the Utah Department of Health.

See the Executive Order declaring a State of Emergency here.

See the Executive Order pertaining to DABC licenseshere.

See the Executive Order regarding telehealth here.

See the Executive Order regarding parole hearingshere.

See the Executive order pertaining to previously retired State employees here.

Update Sept 11, 2020: Lowering Restrictions in Box Elder and Carbon Counties

SALT LAKE CITY (Sept. 11, 2020) - In close consultation with local health authorities and with the Utah Department of Health, Gov. Gary R. Herbert has issued an Executive Order moving Box Elder County and Carbon County to the Minimal Level of Restriction Status, or Green.

View the full order here.

You can see the restriction level for all counties here.

Update Sept 4, 2020: Lowering Restrictions in Salt Lake City and Sevier County.

SALT LAKE CITY (September 4, 2020) - In close consultation with local health authorities and with the Utah Department of Health, Gov. Gary R. Herbert has issued an Executive Order moving all of Salt Lake County to the Low Level of Restriction Status, or Yellow. The order also moves Sevier County to the Minimal Level of Restriction Status, or Green.

Restriction levels for all areas of the state can be seen here.

Along with these changes, the governor has extended the order requiring face coverings to be worn in all state facilities.

View the order on restrictions here.

View the order on face coverings here.

Update Sept 1, 2020: What does COVID-19 do in the human body?

COVID-19 is a respiratory disease caused by a virus named SARS-CoV-2. COVID-19 means “coronavirus disease identified in 2019.” Sometimes, people use coronavirus and COVID-19 interchangeably, but they are distinct things: One is a virus, and one is a disease caused by the virus.

Learn more HERE.

Update Aug 21, 2020: Utah State of Emergency

Yesterday, Governor Gary Herbert reissued an executive order declaring a state of emergency. All state of emergency orders are in effect for one month at a time.

Utah has been under a state of emergency for the pandemic since March 6, 2020.

A state of emergency is a legal status in state code for the operations of state government that allow state government the flexibility it needs to respond to an emergency situation.

Part of that flexibility could include the following:

Some have said Utah has issued too many orders this year. Most of those executive orders are updates to prior orders issued by the governor. See the list of executive orders at rules.utah.gov.

Some have also said emergency powers were never designed to be used for months at a time. The statutes that authorize the Governor to declare a state of emergency specifically include epidemics. Epidemics and pandemics are not short-lived. So it’s clear that state statute expects that if there’s an epidemic, a state of emergency could be in place for long periods of time.

Learn more: Article

Update Aug 11, 2020: Most people won’t have to pay for COVID-19 testing

If you have symptoms of COVID-19 like a fever, cough, shortness of breath, muscle aches, sore throat, or decrease in smell or taste, you should be tested for COVID-19.

The health department may recommend you get tested if you came into close contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19, even if you are not sick. If so, they’ll give you a referral code for testing. Some healthcare workers or residents of high-risk facilities (like nursing homes or homeless shelters) are tested even if they don’t have symptoms. Otherwise, only people with at least one symptom of COVID-19 can get tested.

Learn more here: Coronavirus Utah.gov

Update July 27, 2020: Adopting Updated Phased Guidelines

SALT LAKE CITY (July 27, 2020) - Gov. Gary R. Herbert has issued an Executive Order adopting version 4.9 of the Phased Guidelines. The updates provide guidance for restaurants operating 24 hours per day and restaurants with buffet service. The order is effective immediately and will remain in effect until August 7.

View the full Order here.

View the updated guidelineshere.

Update July 17, 2020: State Offers Free Counseling for COVID-Related Stress

More than 40 crisis counselors are ready to answer your call if you are experiencing stress, anxiety or depression or increased substance misuse because of COVID-19.

The Utah Strong Recovery Project is funded by a FEMA grant facilitated by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The funding is designated to the Utah Department of Human Services Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health to provide statewide emotional support services specifically as a result of the pandemic. Services include emotional support, crisis counseling, mental health education and coping strategies, and referral to additional services and professional help, if needed. All information is confidential and free of charge.

The team of professionals has already helped more than 150 individuals through its initial targeted outreach. With more counselors now on board, the services are available to all Utahns who need help coping with any stress related to COVID-19.

To talk to a Utah Strong Recovery Project counselor seven days a week 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., call/text 385-386-2289 or email your first name and phone number to UtahStrong@utah.gov. After hours if you need an immediate response, please contact the Utah statewide Crisis Line at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or the SAMHSA Distress Hotline at 1-800-985-5990. Video chat and counseling in Spanish and other languages are available.

Update July 17, 2020: Mandating Masks in all K-12 Schools

SALT LAKE CITY (July 17, 2020) - Gov. Gary R. Herbert has issued an Executive Order adopting version 4.8 of the Phased Guidelines. The updated guidelines allow but do not require, schools in the Orange (Medium Risk) Phase to open and provide some level of in-person instruction. The order is effective immediately and will remain in effect until August 7.

Today the Utah Department of Health issued a public health order mandating the use of face coverings in all K-12 schools. The order establishes certain exemptions that will apply when an individual is maintaining physical distancing of at least six feet apart from another individual when the individual is eating or drinking, and if the individual has a medical condition, mental health condition, or a disability that prevents the wearing of the face covering.

The public health order is effective immediately and will remain in effect until December 31.

View the updated phased guidelines here.

View the public health order here and the full Executive Order here.

Update July 10, 2020: New “Travel Guidance” offers recommendations

Starting today, a new guidance page can be found here on Utah’s Coronavirus website. The page, called “Travel Guidance,” gives travelers recommendations on what to consider when thinking about travel (both within the United States and internationally.)

Generally, there are no restrictions in the state with regard to travel. But, that doesn’t mean there aren’t risks. The information on this page can help if you’re thinking about traveling and answer some questions about what to do when you get back.

This page has also been translated into Spanish (Esta página ya está traducidaal español.)

Information on travel can also be found on our FAQ page.

Update July 10, 2020: Orders for Utah’s Health Risk Status

SALT LAKE CITY (July 10, 2020) - Gov. Herbert announced today that he is extending the Executive Order pertaining to the mandate of face coverings to be worn in all state facilities. He also extended Utah’s Health Risk Status, leaving Salt Lake City in Moderate Risk, or Orange, ten counties in the Normal Risk, or Green and the rest of the state in Low Risk, or Yellow.

Both orders will remain in effect until July 24 at 11:59 p.m.

You can view the Order on face coverings in state facilities here.

You can view the Order on the Health Risk Status here.

Update Jun 18, 2020: Moving Sections of Rural Utah to Green Health Risk Status

SALT LAKE CITY (June 18, 2020) - In close consultation with local health authorities and with the Utah Department of Health, Gov. Gary R. Herbert has approved requests for the following counties to transition to Green, or New Normal Health Risk Status: Beaver, Daggett, Duchesne, Emery, Garfield, Millard, Piute, Uintah and Wayne beginning tomorrow, June 19, 2020 at 1:00 pm.

Update Jun 12, 2020: Updated Guidelines as well Health Risk Statuses

SALT LAKE CITY (June 12, 2020) - In close consultation with local health authorities and with the Utah Department of Health, Gov. Gary R. Herbert has issued an Executive Order moving Kane County to the New Normal Health Risk Status, or Green as well as Bluff and Mexican Hat to the Low Health Risk Status, or Yellow. Salt Lake City will remain in Orange. Along with these changes the Governor has adopted updated guidelines for areas in the Low and New Normal health risk designation.

The order specifically addresses updated guidelines pertaining to high-risk individuals, gatherings, businesses, education and events.

The order is effective immediately and will remain in effect until 11:59 p.m. on June 26. View the full Orderhere.

View the updated phased guidelines here.

Update June 1, 2020: Uninsured COVID-19 Testing Assistance

If you are uninsured and meet residency/citizenship guidelines, you may be eligible to receive coverage for COVID-19 testing and other related services. This coverage can also help pay for any COVID-19 testing you may have already received. The UDOH and other medical providers will provide you more information on this coverage and determine if you qualify. Click here to apply for the COVID-19 Uninsured Testing Coverage.

Update May 29, 2020: Transitioning Grand County, West Valley City and Magna to Yellow Health Risk Status

SALT LAKE CITY (May 29, 2020) - In consultation with the Utah Department of Health and the Local Health Departments, Gov. Gary R. Herbert has issued an Executive Order moving Grand County, West Valley City and Magna to Low Health Risk Status, or Yellow.

Per the Order, Salt Lake City, Bluff and Mexican Hat will remain at Moderate Health Risk, or Orange.

The order is effective immediately.

View the full Executive Order here.

Update May 27, 2020: Updated Guidelines for Low-Risk Phase in the Utah

SALT LAKE CITY (May 27, 2020) - Gov. Gary R. Herbert has issued an Executive Order updating guidelines for areas in low health risk designation under Utah’s phased health guidance plan.

The order specifically addresses updated guidelines pertaining to socia

The new order clarifies that generally all businesses that are within the counties that have been moved to the low risk phase are operating if they can meet and adhere to the specific guidelines. For clarity, the order states symptom checking in public and business interactions should happen when feasible.

Travel guidelines request that all continue to avoid non-essential travel to areas with widespread community transmission of COVID-19.

The guidance for K-12 education addresses the resumption of school activities, including sports, under jurisdiction of district and school authorities in adherence to indoor and outdoor guidelines. Additionally, hand sanitizer will need to be made available to faculty and students in each classroom and regular hand washing routines will be instituted. Faculty and staff will need to wear face coverings when social distancing is not possible. Updates regarding face coverings for students will be provided by local school and charter boards in consultation with health department officials.

Regarding higher education, campuses may be open for in-person classes with increased cleaning and hygiene regimen. In cooperation with the Utah System of Higher Education, each institution will develop individualized plans for repopulating campus, monitoring for incidence, containing outbreaks, and reclosing if necessary.

More updated information regarding higher education, outdoor recreation, including pools and waterparks can be found in the guidelines attached.

The order is effective immediately and remains in effect until 11:59 p.m. on June 5. View the full order here.

View the updated phased guidelines here.

l gatherings, education, businesses, travel and events.

Update May 22, 2020: Moving Bluff and Mexican Hat to Orange Health Risk Status

SALT LAKE CITY (May 22, 2020) - In close consultation with local health authorities and with the Utah Department of Health, Gov. Gary R. Herbert has approved requests for the municipalities of Bluff and Mexican Hat to transition to Orange, or Moderate Health Risk Status. Both areas are located in San Juan County.

Gov. Herbert issued the following statement:

“Because of difficult conditions in the Navajo Nation and along its borders, we are transitioning the municipalities of Bluff and Mexican Hat from yellow to orange to signal a significant health risk in the area. We very much appreciate working with Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez on efforts to combat COVID-19. Our hearts go out to all of our Navajo friends who have been impacted by this awful virus.”

Utah’s color-coded health guidance for Southeastern Utah does not apply to the current situation on Navajo Nation lands located in Utah, as these are sovereign lands. The State of Utah strongly encourages Utah residents living on tribal lands to follow all tribal health directives. Information on public health orders on Navajo Nation lands can be found here.

The order is effective immediately and can be viewed here.

Update May 21, 2020: Transitioning Summit and Wasatch Counties to Yellow Health Risk Status

UPDATE (August 14, 2020) - A recent public health order has changed references to “risk” to “restriction.” So in this blog post, references to “Low Risk” really mean “Low Restriction Level.”

SALT LAKE CITY (May 21, 2020) - In consultation with the Utah Department of Health and the Summit and Wasatch County Health Departments, Gov. Gary R. Herbert has issued an Executive Order moving Summit County and Wasatch County to Low Health Risk Status, or Yellow.

The order is effective immediately.

View the full Executive Order here.

Update May 15, 2020: Moving Much of Utah to Yellow Health Risk Status

May 15, 2020 - In accordance with yesterday’s announcement, and in consultation with the Utah Department of Health and local health departments across the state, Gov. Gary R. Herbert issued an Executive Order this afternoon moving much of Utah to Low Health Risk Status, or Yellow, effective at 12:01 a.m. on Saturday, May 16.

While most counties in the state are transitioning to Yellow, the order clarifies that Grand County, Summit County and Wasatch will remain in the Orange Health Risk Status.

After consultation with local health departments, Salt Lake City, West Valley City, and Magna metro township will also remain in Orange. The color-coded Phased Guidelines have also been updated on the Utah Leads Togethter page.

Updates to Utah’s Phased Guidelines detail considerations for faith groups returning to in-person religious services, provide guidance on arts and entertainment, institute protocols for continuing driver’s education, and clarify requirements for K-12 school operations in the 2020-2021 school year.

View the full order here.

View the updated phased guidelines here.

Update May 6, 2020: Recommendations for Moderate- and Low-Risk Phases

New Guidance Applies to Social Gatherings, Outdoor Recreational Activities, Gyms, and Personal Care Services

May 6, 2020) - Gov. Gary R. Herbert has issued an Executive Order clarifying guidelines in the moderate- and low-risk phases of the Utah Leads Together plan.

The order specifically addresses guidelines pertaining to social gatherings, outdoor recreation, personal services, gyms and fitness centers.

The new order clarifies that “private social interactions that occur without oversight by a formal organization are allowable in groups of 20 or fewer” in the moderate-risk phase. The same guidance applies to groups of 50 or fewer in the low-risk phase.

Outdoor recreation guidelines clarify that no one should participate in sporting activities that require teammates to be closer than 10 feet from one another, and clients obtaining personal care services can remove their mask when it would interfere with the service they are receiving.

Gyms may allow skills and conditioning activities when social distancing guidelines are followed. Again, anyone participating in sporting activities must remain 10 feet away from other persons.

The order is effective immediately and remains in effect until 11:59 p.m. on May 15. View the full order here.

View the updated phased guidelines here.

Update April 29, 2020: Utah “Moderate Risk” Protocols for COVID-19

(April 29, 2020) - Gov. Gary R. Herbert issued an Executive Order that formally places the state of Utah under “moderate risk” protocols for COVID-19 beginning on May 1, 2020, at 12:01 a.m. Detailed guidelines are provided in the updated Utah Leads Together Plan, and apply to individuals and businesses.

Under “moderate risk,” Utahns are still encouraged to stay home as much as possible but may see small groups of family and friends who have been following recommendations on distancing and hygiene. Some establishments that have been closed by public health orders, including gyms, salons, and other personal care establishments, are permitted to resume operations under very strict guidelines. Dine-in options are once again permitted, where eating establishments exercise extreme precautions detailed in the plan.

Read the full Executive Order ​here.
View the updated phased guidelines here.

Update April 22, 2020: Healthy Together Beta App

SALT LAKE CITY (April 22, 2020) - Today, Gov. Herbert announced the public beta testing phase for Healthy Together, a symptom checking mobile application that helps augment current contact tracing efforts. The app is designed to help Utahns work together in concert with public health officials to slow the spread of COVID-19.

The app is free to download, and use of the app is strictly opt-in and voluntary. Users own their location data and can delete it at any time. Personal data shared with public health officials will be used solely to combat COVID-19. Location data will be automatically deleted every 30 days, and symptom data will be automatically de-identified after 30 days. Healthy Together complies with State requirements for data security and encryption.

You can download Healthy Together in your app store, from coronavirus.utah.gov/healthy-together-app, or from healthytogetherutah.com.

Updated April, 2020: CVMC to Resume Some Elective Surgeries

Central Valley Medical Center will resume some surgical procedures in a measured and cautious way in accordance with the update to the Utah Department of Health public health order of March 23, which suspended elective procedures due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The updated order allows for the resumption of some elective procedures pursuant to guidelines established in consultation with the Utah Hospital Association, the Utah Medical Association, the Utah Dental Association, and other medical providers.

You can view the Utah article here.

You can view the full order, and its guidance regarding procedures, here.

You can view the Utah Hospital Association’s roadmap for resuming elective procedures here.

Updated April 6, 2020: CVMC POSTPONES Annual Spring Health Fair

To help ensure the safety of our patients, staff, and community during the COVID-19 Pandemic; CVMC has postponed the annual Spring Health Fair tentatively until August 2020.

Updated April 1, 2020: CVMC Updates Visitation Policies

The ongoing safety of patients, caregivers, and our communities remains Central Valley Medical Center's top priority. We know it’s difficult for patients, their families and friends to be physically apart, particularly during a hospital stay when having loved ones near gives patients comfort and peace. We recognize the significant sacrifice families and friends are making to support our visitor guidelines and help us create a safe care environment in our facilities during this pandemic. In response to the growing number of COVID-19 cases, Central Valley Medical Center is not allowing visitors for patients, except under a limited number of special circumstances. Beginning April 3, 2020, these exceptions include:

At all facilities:

  • Only enter the facility to seek care for yourself. Please do not accompany a patient.
  • We DO NOT allow anyone under age 18 to enter the facility except to seek care for themselves.
  • Please wash your hands or use alcohol sanitizer before and after leaving a patient room, exam room, and a facility.

At Nephi Hospital Campus:

  • Hospice/End of Life Care; Two visitors are allowed only for the end of life patients.
  • Minor’s under age 18; One visitor or guardian per day.
  • Discharged Patient; One visitor allowed at the time of discharge.
  • Laboring Patients and Postpartum Patients; One support person throughout the stay.

THANK YOU

We appreciate your help in protecting our community from the transmission of COVID-19. It’s our foremost duty as healthcare professionals to keep people safe from harm, and it is a duty we share with you. We all hold an important public health responsibility during these unprecedented times, and your support in our response to COVID-19 is invaluable to preserving the health and safety of our community.

Update Mar 31, 2020: CVMC Implements Telemedicine to Provide Options for Medical Care

TELEMEDICINE NOW AT CVMC!

Central Valley Medical Center’s patients can now take care of ongoing medical problems in the safety of their homes during the coronavirus outbreak. Our goal is to help keep patients as close to home as possible, so they can receive the right care, in the right place, at the right time.

CVMC Nephi and Santaquin Clinics will now be offering Telemedicine visits during clinic hours 8:00 am till 3:00 pm. Patients can call CVMC’s Central Scheduling line at 435-623-3200 or their physician’s office directly, to schedule an appointment.

Update Mar 30, 2020: CVMC Clinic Hours Change During COVID-19 Outbreak

Central Valley Medical Center's Medical Clinics will be operating under new hours of operation. All three medical clinics located in Nephi, Fountain Green, and in Santaquin City will be open Monday-Friday from 8:00 am till 3:00 pm to help minimize the spread of COVID-19. Nephi Clinic will also operate urgent care hours from 9 am till 12 noon on Saturdays.

The Nephi Clinic will also have a dedicated COVID-19 Specialty Clinic set up for patients who are showing the symptoms of the coronavirus and wish to be seen. This clinic will be open from 8:00 am till 5:00 pm.

Central Valley Medical Center wants to remind the public that most cases of COVID-19 will not mean hospitalization or even a trip to an emergency room. However, if you and think you may have been exposed to a COVID-19 patient or recent travel to an area where COVID-19 is active and you think you may have been exposed, then; please follow these guidelines.

  • No Symptoms; If you are sick, stay home and manage your symptoms as you would any other common illness. If you have general questions about COVID-19 call the CVMC Coronavirus hotline anytime, 24/7, at 435-623-3254 to talk to a nurse.
  • Mild Symptoms; If you are sick with mild symptoms and feel you need screening, call the CVMC Coronavirus hotline anytime, 24/7, at 435-623-3254 to talk to a nurse. Please self-isolate and follow prevention measures to help reduce the chance of spread.
  • Severe Symptoms; If you’re experiencing life-threatening, severe symptoms, dial 9-1-1 or visit the closest emergency room.

Update Mar 25, 2020: CVMC Implements State Health Order to Stop All Non-Urgent Surgeries

On March 23, 2020, the state of Utah issued a state public health order to preserve masks, gloves and other protective equipment for medical professionals assisting in the fight against COVID-19, the Utah Department of Health has announced restrictions on medical, dental, and veterinary procedures that are non-urgent.

“I genuinely appreciate the willingness of Utah’s major healthcare systems, and many individual doctors, dentists, veterinarians, and other health providers, to act proactively to help us preserve the masks, gowns, gloves, and other personal protective equipment (PPE) that will be necessary in the coming days and weeks to protect our front-line doctors, nurses and other health workers and ensure they stay healthy and able to care for patients,” Gov. Gary R. Herbert said.

...

“I also appreciate the patience of Utahns who were planning procedures that will now be delayed,” the governor added. “Although the term ‘elective’ indicates something that is non-essential, I realize this will still be an inconvenience, and for that I am sorry. As we look at the experiences of other states and regions of the world, it’s clear that those who are proactive in securing a supply of PPE are far better equipped when they see a surge of COVID-19 patients being admitted to hospitals.”

“Postponing non-essential procedures is a crucial step to help our health systems preserve PPE, and other resources that are crucial in our efforts to treat patients with coronavirus,” said Dr. Joseph Miner, executive director of the Utah Department of Health.

According to guidance by the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service, examples of elective procedures include colonoscopies, cataracts, endoscopies, and other procedures that can be delayed without endangering patients.

This order is effective March 25 through April 25, 2020. You can view the full order here.

Update Mar 18, 2020: Press Release; CVMC Continues safe & routine care

Central Valley Medical Center is working hard to continue to support the community with all their healthcare needs during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. CVMC has a robust COVID-19 preparedness plan and is ready to respond to community needs in collaboration with our local and state health agencies.

The safety of our patients, caregivers, and the community is our top priority at Central Valley Medical Center. Our facilities and staff are prepared to continue safe, routine care during this public health issue with COVID-19. It is important to continue to see your provider for regularly scheduled visits to address your other health care needs. Do not neglect your existing needs. If you need to make an appointment with your provider please call to make an appointment.

Hospitals treat patients with infectious diseases every day. There are protocols in place to care for these patients while ensuring the safety of hospital staff, visitors and the larger community. To help keep our hospital and clinics safe and healthy for everyone please adhere to CVMC’s with new visitor restriction policies which can be viewed at centralvalleymedicalcenter.com. This is just one measure we are taking to help protect everyone who works in and receives care at our facilities.

Central Valley Medical Center wants the public to know that most cases of COVID-19 will not mean hospitalization or even a trip to an emergency room. Hospital care is a precious resource that needs to be reserved for those with the most serious symptoms.

If you have general questions about COVID-19 or if you are sick with mild symptoms, and think you may have been exposed to a COVID-19 patient or recent travel to an area where COVID-19 is active and you think you may have been exposed, then; please self-isolate and follow prevention measures to help reduce the chance of spread. You can call Central Valley Medical Center anytime, 24/7, at 435-623-3254 to talk to a nurse or utilize the Utah Coronavirus Information Hotline at 1-800-456-7707 for a virtual assessment. If you’re experiencing life-threatening, severe symptoms, dial 9-1-1 or visit the closest emergency room.

CVMC is currently coordinating with local and state public health departments and officials. We will continue to gather information and resources to keep our patients, staff, providers, and community updated.

Update Mar 18, 2020: CVMC Implements Coronavirus Hotline

If you are sick with mild symptoms, and feel you need screening, call the CVMC Coronavirus hotline anytime, 24/7, at 435-623-3254 to talk to a nurse. Please self-isolate and follow prevention measures to help reduce the chance of spread.

Update Mar 6, 2020: Governor Declares State of Emergency

On Friday, March 6th Governor Herbert declared a State of Emergency for Utah. Declaring a State of Emergency does not indicate that our state is in distress. We are in a state of readiness. This is a practice Utah has done in the past (for example in advance of wildfire season every year). Utah is taking this preemptive step now so that we can all prepare for a potential increased demand on our health services and resources.

Update Mar 12, 2020: Utah Department of Health is Monitoring COVID-19 Situation

The Utah Department of Health is actively monitoring an outbreak caused by COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) first identified in Wuhan, China. This outbreak began in early December 2019 and continues to expand in China and other countries. It is now in the United States.